cremation services in Allentown, PA

Funeral And Cremation Services For Pets

Losing a pet is so sad, and the loss can be devastating. Having funeral or cremation services in Allentown, PA for your lost pet is a wonderful and healthy way to find some peace after the loss. Read on to learn more about your pet cremation and funeral options.

Planning pet funeral and cremation services start with deciding how you want to send your friend to his final resting place. Pet cremation is a great way to memorialize your pet. You can scatter the ashes somewhere special after the cremation, or keep them in a pet cremation urn. Pet burials are another valid option. You can bury your pet in the comfort of your own yard, or in a pet cemetery.

The next step in planning pet funeral and cremation services is to choose where the service will be held. You can hold the service at your home, where you plan to scatter the ashes, in a funeral home, or in a pet cemetery. Be sure to choose a location that allows you to express your grief in a healthy way, and sets you up to properly begin the healing process.

Next, plan the funeral or memorial service. Just like a service for a deceased person, a pet funeral or memorial is an honorable way to memorialize your pet’s life and say goodbye in a constructive way. Invite friends and family members who were a part of your pet’s life, or understand how important he was to you. Gather around the grave or ashes and share pet memories or stories. You may also choose to play music, read poems or share feelings.

Ask attendants to help eulogize, say prayers, or just talk about how your lost pet made them feel. Bring along special stationary, cards or paper on which people can write down their feelings or thoughts. This way you can hold onto these ideas and memories to go through later on when you miss your pet.

Just like traditional funeral services, pet funeral and memorial services benefit from some sort of visual representation of the deceased. You can craft a small tribute or viewing in the memory of your pet by decorating a table with memories of your lost pet like tags, collars, favorite toys or photos. If you chose to cremate the body, you may also choose to display the urn for the viewing.

If you don’t have an urn, you can also print a large photo of your pet. Feel free to continue decorating with candles, flowers or drawings. You can also collect photos and home videos to make a video montage of your pet.

Losing a pet is painful, but investing in Allentown, PA cremation services or a funeral for your lost friend is a good way to begin to heal. To learn more, you can reach out to Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. We are located at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, and you can visit us anytime. You can also give us a call at (844) 427-3672 for more information.

cremation services in Scranton, PA.

Cremation Service Basics

Planning for your eventual passing or dealing with the recent death of a loved on is never easy. In addition to the change, loss and grief, death also means dealing with making lots of difficult decisions from body preparation, memorial services, and funeral options to burials and more. One thing that can ease the stress is having all the necessary information, especially about cremation services in Scranton, PA. Read on to learn more about the basics of cremation services to decide if its right for you or your recently deceased loved one.

A Technical Break Down

Cremation, in the most technical sense, is when a body is broken down to mineral fragments, gases and ashes by combustion, vaporization, and oxidization. This process has been used for thousands of years, but has become much more advanced in recent times.

Breaking down a body via cremation requires intense heat, oftentimes up to 18000 degrees Fahrenheit. The body is placed into a cremation chamber, and the chamber is heated by natural gas, oil or propane. The heat dries out the body until the bones are calcified into fragments, and all the gases are fully secreted.

The gas is released into a filtration system while the bone fragments cool. After the fragments are cooled, they are ground into a fine ash inside a machine called a cremulator. The ash is put inside an urn or receptacle and returned to the family. On average, it takes about two full hours to cremate a body, and the average human body produces anywhere from three to seven pounds of ash.

The Cost

As awful as it feels, cost is oftentimes one of the foremost concerns for any burial, preparation or cremation. Cremation is becoming more and more popular because it’s generally less expensive than other body disposition choices.

Cremation costs usually include:

  • Cremation equipment such as cremation caskets for burning or urns for ash holding.
  • Funeral home services like body transportation, funeral home services and facilities, staff, and cremation fuel charges.
  • Final resting place costs like burial plot or columbarium purchases. Be aware, there are also fees grave opening and closing, headstone installation and endowment care.

Other Factors To Consider

A lot of people are wary of cremation because of potential religious concerns. However, there are lots of different beliefs when it comes to cremation. In fact, some religions encourage or even require it.

Its also important to remember that cremation doesn’t have to mean you can’t have a funeral or memorial service. Cremation is usually used in addition to other services to remember and honor the deceased.

Is Cremation the Right Choice For You?

Deciding if cremation is the right choice for our and your family, friends and loved ones is ultimately very personal, and depends on what values you deem most important. If you need more information to decide if Scranton, PA cremation services are right for you, you can contact Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. by visiting 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or calling (844) 427-3672.

cremation services in Avoca, PA

Memorial Services

While cremation services in Avoca, PA might seem clinical or impersonal, they are actually one of the more unique, meaningful, and respectful body disposition methods. This is because cremations allow you to plan a memorial service for your lost loved one, and make it easy to make sure that service is personal and special.

Memorial services are for both the living and the dead, as they help honor the deceased while providing a healthy and constructive place for the living to gather, grieve, and begin to heal. An ideal service helps you and your loved ones mourn the loss of the deceased while bringing together those that cared for the deceased so that everyone can pay tribute to him or her in a constructive way.

It can be overwhelming to plan a memorial service for after a cremation. Use these tips to help you plan a memorial service for your lost loved one:

  • Date and Time – One nice thing about cremation services as opposed to burials and funerals is that you don’t have a deadline or specific timeline. With a burial, you need to have the funeral service within a few days of death because of body decomposition. With a cremation service, however, you have as much time as you want since the body is already broken down in the cremation. You can easily plan memorial services at later dates to allow people to come from out of town, or to have it be on a day that holds special meaning for the friends and family of the deceased.
  • Creativity – Once you’ve chosen a day for the memorial, you can start planning the specifics. There are almost no restrictions on what memorials can be, so feel free to get creative. Think about the deceased and what he liked, stood for, or is most remembered for. Take those ideas and use them for inspiration. You can have a theme memorial, make video tributes, scatter ashes in a ceremony, or even do things the deceased liked to do. For example, if the deceased loved golf, have a golf themed cremation service. If the deceased really loved one specific spot in a park, hold the service in that spot in the park and scatter his ashes there (with a proper permit.)
  • Ask for Help – While planning memorial services can be bittersweet or even exciting, they also happen during a time of loss and can bring up stressful feelings. You might need help with the planning, and that’s OK. Ask for help from other family members or loved ones, or hire professionals. Find a funeral home or crematory that has experience with memorial services to help you plan your event with compassion and attention.

Use these tips to help make your lost loved one’s memorial service unique, respectful, and special for everyone involved. If you would like more guidance, or want to learn more about Avoca, PA cremation services, Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. is here to help. Please pay us a visit at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or give us a call at (844) 427-3672.

cremation service in Allentown, PA

Memorial Jewelry After Cremation Services

Losing a loved one is always hard, especially since you can’t keep them close to you. However, thanks to memorial jewelry, you can keep your lost loved one close long after the cremation service in Allentown, PA. Memorial jewelry is a creative and personalized way to memorialize a deceased loved one for generations to come.

But what is memorial jewelry? Memorial jewelry can come in many forms, from necklaces and rings to lockets, pendants and bracelets, but every form is a special reminder of the deceased.

Most memorial jewelry is made through a similar process. Once a body is cremated, the family sends the remains to a jeweler. The remains, consisting of minerals like calcium phosphates, are combined with molten glass gold, silver, platinum or other materials using special encasement methods to mold the remains and the metals together. The goal is this molding is to display and protect the cremated remains.

Since every person’s chemical makeup is slightly different, every piece of memorial jewelry will have a slightly different chemical reaction, resulting in different colors, shapes, and patterns. In other words, every piece of memorial jewelry will be just as unique as the person it’s made from. Families can also choose to include items like hair or dried flowers in the jewelry piece for even more uniqueness.

If you’re considering memorial jewelry for your lost loved one, there are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • Material – Though you can have memorial jewelry in almost any material, you should think about how and how often you’re going to wear it, as some materials are more durable than others. For example, if you’re making a ring that you’re only going to wear on special occasions, resin is fine. However, if you want to wear the ring on a daily basis, you need a stronger material like silver.
  • The Deceased – Also keep in mind how the deceased would want to be memorialized. Think about his or her styles, preferences, and even interests for inspiration. How do you think you could best memorialize your lost loved one?
  • Style – You should choose memorial jewelry in a style that you will actually wear. If you don’t like big pendants, maybe choose a small bracelet or locket. Be sure that you choose a style that fits your comfort level, or consider a piece that is simple and timeless for the coming generations.

Memorial jewelry is just one of the many options you have to memorialize a lost loved one after a cremation. If memorial jewelry isn’t for you, you can always choose a more traditional method like a displaying the remains in a cremation urn, scattering them, burying them, or putting up a headstone.

If you want to learn more about memorial jewelry, or other Allentown, PA cremation services, you can contact Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. Please visit us at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or give us a call at (844) 427-3672 for more information.

cremations in Stroudsburg, PA

2019 Cremation Trends

From social media to clothing and beyond, almost everything has trends. This includes cremations in Stroudsburg, PA. As cremations rise in popularity, trends are beginning to emerge. Here are the top cremation trends for 2019. Learn more about each one to see if they might be right for your eventual or for a recently deceased loved one.

  • Scattering Parties – Scattering parties are the answer to what to do with the deceased cremated remains. Rather than a private ceremony, the new trend is to have a scattering party or event tied to releasing the ashes. As people are starting to leave detailed cremation instructions and release requests, its even easier to plan an event that matches your lost loved one’s interests and spirit. Scattering events have taken a life of their own, from sails and hikes to everything in between. They are a wonderful way to celebrate the lost loved one in a unique way as you put them to rest.
  • Water Cremations – As more and more states are making water cremations legal, they are quickly becoming very popular. Unlike traditional, flame-based cremations, water cremations are much better for the environment. They also simulate standard body decay processes for a more “natural” disposition. Not to mention that the cremated remains from a water cremation are much lighter and less likely to be mixed with harmful pollutants than those from a standard cremation as the remains were not burned at extreme temperatures or exposed to chemicals and gases.
  • Cremation Jewels – Everyone knows you can turn your loved one’s ashes into jewelry, but not everyone knows you can turn them into actual jewels. Thanks to major technological advancements, you can quickly turn your loved one into a precious stone for a pretty fair price. You can send the deceased’s ashes to have them be pressed into a diamond that can then be set into jewelry, or turned into a priceless family heirloom. Every diamond made from cremated remains is just as unique and precious as the person it came from.
  • Painted Ash Art – You can also use cremated remains in paint for art pieces. Remains are mixed with special paint that can then be used to produce a portrait of the deceased, or another special image. Cremated ashes have also been used in sculpting materials to create unique vases and home items that can be given to family members of the deceased. Its important to note, though, that you have to find a qualified and experienced artist that is comfortable with working with cremated ashes, and knows how to treat this material with respect. These cremation art pieces are always unique, and can be treasured for generations to come.

These are just a few of the many ways that cremations are changing and evolving with the times. Whether you’re interested in these trends, or want to learn more about traditional Stroudsburg, PA cremations, Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. can help. Pay us a visit at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or give us a call at (844) 427-3672.

Cremations in Altoona, PA

Water Cremations

Cremations in Altoona, PA have been popular for a very long time, but have been even more so in recent years for many reasons including price, ease, flexibility, and environmental benefits. However, there is a new kind of cremation on the market that may offer all those benefits and more: water cremation.

Water cremation, or alkaline hydrolysis, puts an interesting and unique spin on traditional cremation procedures, and might even be better for the environment as it simulates a more natural tissue and bone decay process than traditional flame-based methods.

Water cremations do not involve any burning, so no harmful gases or pollutants are released into the air. Rather, during a water cremation, the body is placed in a steel chamber. The chamber is then filled with an alkaline solution made up of 95% water and 5% potassium hydroxide, and raised to a very high pressure to prevent boiling. The chamber, and the body in the solution, is then heated to around 350 degrees Fahrenheit for an extended period of time, from 4 to 16 hours. The heat, pressure and solution work together to break down the body, leaving only the bones. At the beginning of the process, the mixture is strongly basic, with a pH level of approximately 14. However, by the end of the process, the pH can drop 11.

The body slowly dissolves, and the bones, once removed from the chamber, crushed into ash and returned to the family just like in a traditional cremation. However, water cremated remains are much lighter in color and in texture than classic cremated remains. Cremated remains made from flames are often darker and denser from the various combustion reactions that occur when the body is heated under extreme temperatures.

While water cremation may seem strange, it’s actually just a more sped up version of what would happen when a body decays naturally. Interestingly, the process was originally developed as a way to process animal carcasses into plant food back in 1888. In 2007, a biochemist from Scotland founded a company to make the machines necessary to use the method to process human remains.

2007 wasn’t that long ago, so water cremations are still pretty new. The method is so new, in fact, that it’s currently only legal as a means of final disposition in 16 states, including Oregon, Illinois, Colorado, Nevada, California, and more. Laws on water cremation are currently pending in stats like New Jersey, New York, and our own Pennsylvania.

Though out of the box, water cremations might be the way of the future. Would you consider a water cremation for yourself or for a lost loved one? Whether or not you would, you can still turn to Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc.

Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. has been offering compassionate, effective and professional Altoona, PA cremation services for many years. You can count on us to help guide you through your difficult time of loss. To learn more about cremations, and what we can do for you, please visit us at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or give us a call at (844) 427-3672.

cremation in State College, PA

Tips For Writing A Eulogy

It may seem like an impossible task to write a eulogy for someone you know and love after they’ve passed away. Whether you’re speaking at a funeral or after cremation in State College, PA, you can use these tips to help make your eulogy writing easier.

  1. Keep it Brief – Although it seems tough to cram a whole life into a few minutes, the eulogy should not be longer than 5 minutes. Focus on the main parts of the deceased’s life, and be sure to write your speech down so you don’t stray off topic.
  2. Keep it Personal – Focus on the good and positive things in the deceased’s life, and don’t be afraid to add a bit of mild humor to keep things light. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to add a few personal stories or memories.
  3. Stay Positive – Although cremations and memorials are somber, you should still remain focused on the person’s life and not their death. Avoid talking about negative moments or things that might cast a poor light on him or her, as the purpose of the eulogy is to honor the deceased.
  4. Be Prepared – Write your eulogy before the service. That way, everything you are going to say is planned out so you don’t have to worry in the moment. Print it out on a paper so you’re not messing with a phone or tablet.
  5. Delivery is Key – You don’t have to be a professional actor or public speaker, but be aware of your delivery. Try to use a light conversational tone, and look up from the paper every few sentences to connect with the rest of the people at the service.
  6. Add a Bio – While you can structure the eulogy with stories and moments, it’s easier to frame it as a short biography. Include details like place of birth, marriage, children and other big milestones to keep the story linear and easy to follow. Though these details may seem trivial, they are an important part of every eulogy.
  7. Details – Don’t forget to add details like your name and your relationship to the deceased. You should also be sure to thank everyone for coming, and mention why everyone is gathered.
  8. End High – End your eulogy on a good note, like a fond memory or the impact the deceased had on your life. You can also finish by saying a final goodbye, or mentioning that this is exactly the way the person would want things to be. You never want to leave the funeral attendees feeling more upset than when they arrived.

Giving a eulogy doesn’t have to be stressful if you are prepared. Use these tips to make sure you’re as prepared as possible to honor your lost loved one through the eulogy.

If you want more tips on eulogies, or want to learn more about State College, PA cremations, contact Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. Visit us at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, or give us a call at (844) 427-3672.

cremation in Easton, PA

Outdoor Cremation Urns

You aren’t limited to displaying or housing your loved ones remains in an indoor urn after cremation in Easton, PA. In fact, there are hundreds of options when it comes to body disposition post cremation. From scattering and water burials, to inurnment in a columbarium and more, you can get as creative as you want for your loved ones post-cremation final resting place.

One option is burial, inurnment or display outdoors. You can easily house your loved ones cremated remains in an urn above or below ground outside. If you decide to go this route, however, you do need to choose an urn that specifically made for outdoor use. These outdoor urns are designed to remain intact and even beautiful even after long years of outdoor exposure to dirt, dust, rain, snow and more.

When shopping for an outdoor urn, you first need to decide if the urn will stay above ground, or be buried below ground, as there are both above and below ground urns.

Above Ground Outdoor Urns

Many cemeteries have a columbarium. Columbariums are spaces, rooms or buildings designed to hold and display cremation urns. They have numerous individual niches carved into the walls for this purpose. If you’re planning on inurning your loved one’s cremated remains outdoors but above ground, it will most likely be in a columbarium.

When choosing an above ground outdoor urn, a metal urn is best. Bronze, brass, pewter, and stainless steel are great choices, although almost any urn designed for human remains will most likely work. However, it’s important to keep in mind that unless the outer wall of the columbarium is made of glass, you probably won’t be able see the urn once it’s been placed. Therefore you don’t have to worry about decoration too much. You can choose ceramic or glass, but these urns are not ideal for outdoor use as they are more vulnerable to cracking.

Below Ground Outdoor Urns

You can also choose to bury your loved one’s cremated remains. Like traditional full body burial, burying cremated remains allows you to have a defined place where family and friends can go to remember the lost loved one. In some cases, many families already own a burial plot, and want to use this land even if the deceased is cremated. Most cemeteries require an urn vault when burying cremated remains. The vault is typically sealed to keep out moisture and other elements of nature. Since the vault will bear the brunt of the natural exposure, any kind of urn will do.

If you don’t have to have an urn vault, you need to choose an urn that is durable. Strong urns from metal, composites or resins are ideal. A cremation urn made from wood, ceramic, or glass would most likely to lose its integrity over time, leaving the deceased’s remains exposed.

Contact Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. by visiting 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641 or calling (844) 427-3672 to learn more about outdoor urns and Easton, PA cremations.

cremation in State College, PA

Important Cremation Provider Terminology

Loss is always hard, but it can feel a little easier if you do a little planning. One way to better plan for a cremation in State College, PA is to learn important cremation provider terminology like the following:

  • Bereaved: The deceased’s loved ones or immediate family.
  • Burial Certificate: A legal document authorizing burial. The same documents apply to cremations, and it made by your local government.
  • Death Certificate: A document proving the cause of death, generally issued by the deceased’s doctor.
  • Columbarium: A wall with niches or holes in which cremation urns are housed.
  • Committal Service: A service in which the body is buried or interred.
  • Cremains: Another word for cremated remains.
  • Crematory: The furnace in which bodies are cremated. It can also refer to the building that houses the furnace.
  • Death Notice: An article or newspaper section announcing someone’s death and providing funeral or memorial details.
  • Embalm: Preserving a dead body by running preservative fluids through the arteries and veins.
  • Eulogy: A speech praising, remembering and celebrating the deceased’s life.
  • Exhume: Digging up the remains of someone who was already buried.
  • Flower Car: The car or vehicle used to transport the flowers from the church and/or cemetery to the funeral home.
  • Funeral Director: The man or woman who works with the bereaved to plan and execute a funeral service and all accompanying details. Generally, funeral directors maintain or run funeral homes.
  • Funeral Spray: A floral tribute traditionally given to the bereaved at a funeral.
  • Grave Liner: A wooden, metal or concrete casing that holds the casket in the ground. Grave liners help prevent the ground around the grave from sinking for safety and help keep the grass above the grave level as the earth settles for aesthetics.
  • Pallbearers: Family, friends, or religious members that help carry the casket.
  • Memorial Service: A service held to honor the deceased when the body is not present.
  • Mortuary: Another word for a funeral home.
  • Obituary: A death notice in a newspaper or on a website that gives a small biography of the deceased and often includes a photo.
  • Plot: A piece of land, usually owned by an individual or a family, that’s reserved for two or more graves.
  • Reposing Room: A room in a funeral home that stores the body until the burial or funeral.
  • Vault: Almost synonymous with grave liner, but vaults tend to be more expensive. Vaults are usually made of wood, metal or concrete.
  • Viewing: The time at which friends, family or funeral goers can view the casket.

If you have more questions about State College, PA cremations, terms, or planning for a cremation, Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. can help. Please stop by and visit us at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641. You can also give us a call at (844) 427-3672 to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss.

cremations in Easton, PA

Veteran Cremation Services

Serving in the armed forces is an incredible personal sacrifice, and our veterans deserve our gratitude in any way we can give it. One way we show our thanks is through veteran’s cremations in Easton, PA. It’s important to know about the post-humus benefits that are available to veterans. Read on to learn more about cremation and funeral services benefits for eligible veterans, so you can ensure your loved one gets the thanks he or she deserves.

Military Funeral Service Protocol and Honors

The United States has laws that provide eligible veterans with military funeral and cremation service honors as no cost if the family requests. Some of these honors include:

  • Flag Folding and Presentation: All eligible veterans will have at least 2 Armed Forces members serving as an honor guard during the funeral or cremation service. At least one of these guards will be from the deceased’s service branch, and this guard will present a traditionally folded American flag to the next of kin or designated person.
  • “Taps”- “Taps” is a bugle song long associated with military and patriotic funerals. Though live bugle performances are rarely seen these days, military funeral honors require that a high-quality recording of the song be played at any eligible funeral or cremation services if no live bugle is available.

Flag Burial

Another veteran’s funeral or cremation service is a flag burial. A flag is provided at no cost to the family to drape the casket or accompany the urn of the deceased. The flag will be folded and presented to eligible family members including the next of kin or requested friends. Family members may donate their flags to national cemeteries with Avenue of Flags so the flag can be flown on patriotic holidays to honor the deceased.

Veteran Headstone

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) can also furnish a headstone at no cost. These veteran’s headstones are available for any veteran regardless of date of death. The headstones are available in bronze, marble and granite in various styles to match existing headstones in the place of burial. This same service is available for cremated remains in the form of niche markers for columbariums. While the headstone itself is free of charge, the family is in charge of all installation fees.

Is My Loved One Eligible?

Military funeral and cremation service honors are given to members of the United States Armed Forces that consist of the Marines, Army, National Guard, Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard. The individual must also meet one or more the following requirements:

  • Died in active duty or Selective Reserve
  • Completed at least one term of enlistment or initial obligated service in the Selective Reserve, and were not dishonorably discharged
  • Served on active duty, or in the Selected Reserve, and were not dishonorably discharged

If you want to learn more about veteran cremation and funeral service honors and eligibility, contact Cremation Specialist of Pennsylvania, Inc. We are located at 728 Main St Avoca, PA 18641, and offer a range of Easton, PA cremation services. Give us a call today at (844) 427-3672 to learn more.